Killer Yellow

A gawker sifts.

mpdrolet:

Shiprock Clouds, New Mexico, 2013
Lois Conner

mpdrolet:

Shiprock Clouds, New Mexico, 2013

Lois Conner

(via photographsonthebrain)

billdanedotcom:

918 Richmond on Flickr.

(Source: bobbydoherty)

whereiseefashion:

Match #90
Magdalena Frackowiak for Dazed&Confused February 2010 by John Olins wearing Victor&Rolf | Concrete plasticity by Alexandra Polyakova

whereiseefashion:

Match #90

Magdalena Frackowiak for Dazed&Confused February 2010 by John Olins wearing Victor&Rolf | Concrete plasticity by Alexandra Polyakova

untitled by fiftyfootshadows on Flickr.

untitled by fiftyfootshadows on Flickr.

Snow’s a No-Show: 8 Images of the Roughest Iditarod Yet

“Gagosian is a broker-dealer, no less than Goldman Sachs is. (Well, maybe his balance sheet is a little bit smaller.) He matches buyers and sellers, and he has to deal with a large amount of counterparty risk. And of course he has to worry about lawsuits, too: there’s a revealing point in the deposition where Gagosian talks about the time “when this matter became a litigation”.

I see him thinking of his business in various ways: there’s the gallery shows, there’s the fairs, there’s the secondary-market deals, and then there’s the litigations. They’re all just part of what it means to be a dealer, these days: sometimes a deal becomes a litigation, and that’s just an occupational hazard when you’re dealing with egos this big.”

As the art market becomes increasingly liquid, investors are willing to pay more for art: an asset class which used to be very hard to sell is now much easier to turn into cash. That makes it more valuable. Of course, there will still be volatility, but there’s a game afoot now. On Wall Street, it used to be called “pump and dump”: find a cheap stock, talk it up, sell it at a massive profit. That’s illegal, on the stock market. But in the art market, people put out press releases boasting of their prowess in such matters:

“In regular finance, if you have insider information about a stock, it is illegal to invest in that stock. In the art world, it is not only legal, it is done regularly. Peter Hort, along with his wife and family, are the people who create the insider information.”

The trends in the art world are clear: newer money is gravitating towards newer art, which is considered a store of financial value and even possibly a source of significant profit. In order to make money in this world, connoisseurship doesn’t particularly help: what you need is “insider information” and the ability to hype certain artists to the type of collector who doesn’t know whether he’s buying a painting or a photograph.

“Surprisingly, fatigue may boost creative powers. For most adults, problems that require open-ended thinking are often best tackled in the evening when they are tired, according to a 2011 study in the journal Thinking & Reasoning. When 428 students were asked to solve a series of two types of problems, requiring either analytical or novel thinking, their performance on the second type was best at non-peak times of day when they were tired. (Their performance on analytical problems didn’t change over the course of the day.) Fatigue, Dr. Wieth says, may allow the mind to wander more freely to explore alternative solutions.”

Vivian Maier

aura218:

0hhgodpleaseshutup:

I FOUND IT. I FOUND MY FAVORITE THING ON THE INTERNET.

putin makes a pretty striking woman

(Source: copano)

Vivian Maier
Ansel Adams, Moonrise over Glacier Point

Yosemite National Park is the very crucible and touchstone for American landscape. Yosemite is one of the most famous landscapes in the world, and it is usually pictured as a virgin wilderness. Literally pictured: in most of the photographs that have been made the place familiar to the world, there are no people. And for landscape photography it is one of the most important places in the world. Charles Weed made some photographs there at the end of the 1850s, just as photographic technology was becoming capable of such things.

When Carleton Watkins took his sweeping landscape photographs, there were very few people and buildings to exclude; but by the time Ansel Adams arrived, structures and people hovered around the outer rim of his images, just out of view. By a strange extension, people have learned to perform this cropping out operation themselves, seeing in the world what they have seen in pictures.

Rebecca Solnit, from Savage Dreams: