Killer Yellow

A gawker sifts.

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’

A major insight into human behavior from pre-internet era studies of communication is the tendency of people not to speak up about policy issues in public — or among their family, friends, and work colleagues — when they believe their own point of view is not widely shared. This tendency is called the “spiral of silence.”

Some social media creators and supporters have hoped that social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter might produce different enough discussion venues that those with minority views might feel freer to express their opinions, thus broadening public discourse and adding new perspectives to everyday discussion of political issues.

We asked respondents where they were getting information about the debates swirling around the Snowden revelations, and found that social media was not a common source of news for most Americans. Traditional broadcast news sources were by far the most common sources. In contrast, social media sources like Facebook and Twitter were the least commonly identified sources for news on this issue.

People reported being less willing to discuss the Snowden-NSA story in social media than they were in person — and social media did not provide an alternative outlet for those reluctant to discuss the issues in person. Not only were social media sites not an alternative forum for discussion, social media users were less willing to share their opinions in face-to-face settings.

In both personal settings and online settings, people were more willing to share their views if they thought their audience agreed with them. …This suggests a spiral of silence might spill over from online contexts to in-person contexts. It also might mean that the broad awareness social media users have of their networks might make them more hesitant to speak up because they are especially tuned into the opinions of those around them.

Bringing Twitter to the Classroom

Picture a computer screen covered in hashtags and “at” signs — #shakespeare and @3rdperiodenglish. Lively debate and direct quotes continue to fill the threads four hours after school has ended. Students upload pictures of their annotated texts and ask their classmates to help them understand the nuances of iambic pentameter.

This is Chris Bronke’s freshman English class at North High School, a public school in Downers Grove, Illinois.

…Bronke used his already-established education-oriented Twitter handle. This meant that the student comments he retweeted were often retweeted and “favorited” by teachers and scholars who wanted to support their ideas. These students learned that their voice mattered even outside of the classroom setting, and that engaging in real dialogue could be fun and worthwhile.

…It could never replace in-class discussion or long form essay writing. These educators do, however, believe that using Twitter and other platforms can help students hone other skills that their generation will need for the future. Learning to be concise, engaging in online dialogue about serious and important topics, condensing information, and forming an opinion in real time—these are skills that will only become more important as technology takes deeper root in society.

seaofempties:

It’s that time again. I am going to Mississippi in October and I need film. I have assembled a few one of a kind sets of signed 5x7 darkroom proofs, based on various series I’ve worked on over the past couple of years. Sets of twenty are $75 (two packs of film) and sets of ten are $40. I’ve also added a few new 16x20s. Check them out on Big Cartel.

shanolyno:

Seven women on water skis holding flags - Cypress Gardens by State Library and Archives of Florida on Flickr.
sinisterhumanists:


BUY THE BOOK

We’ve just published an art book/travelogue about our experience on the road making Empire. Designed by the geniuses at Atelier Carvalho Bernau, this thing is absolutely gorgeous, and includes new writing and behind-the-scenes photography, plus film stills and essays we wrote for Vice and The Creators Project, all wrapped in a really interesting reader interface that ties the writing in the book to the project’s online manifestation…. but if we say too much we might ruin it.

sinisterhumanists:

BUY THE BOOK

We’ve just published an art book/travelogue about our experience on the road making Empire. Designed by the geniuses at Atelier Carvalho Bernau, this thing is absolutely gorgeous, and includes new writing and behind-the-scenes photography, plus film stills and essays we wrote for Vice and The Creators Project, all wrapped in a really interesting reader interface that ties the writing in the book to the project’s online manifestation…. but if we say too much we might ruin it.

(via photographsonthebrain)

marcobohr:

Julien Gremaud, from the series ‘Thatcher is Dead’, 2014 Click here for more.

eyecurious:

Thinking about making a photobook? Blake Andrews has this handy 19-step illustrated guide that explains exactly how to do it and, perhaps more importantly, exactly what it will do to you. 

eyecurious:

Thinking about making a photobook? Blake Andrews has this handy 19-step illustrated guide that explains exactly how to do it and, perhaps more importantly, exactly what it will do to you. 

nicokrijno:

Stick figure

nicokrijno:

Stick figure

“People like Martin Parr won’t get a free copy of my book because I don’t like the entire idea of having these mega-gurus who decide what’s good and what’s not. They do not represent the self-publishing scene, but they still dominate it. I think we have to build up a new generation of publishers and stop kissing the asses of yesterday’s authority figures. Self-publishing should be anti-establishment. The way things are going right now narrows down the very broad spectrum of the photography book scene. Look at all the photography blogs, which mention the same 30 – 40 book titles that everyone is mentioning that year. Luckily enough there are also some photography blogs that are really committed to showing you works you would otherwise not see.”

“Where do ideas come from?” “From looking at one thing and seeing another.”

abealy:

more BWRDS

archiemcphee:

Bristol, England-based professional photographer Justin Quinnell turned his own mouth into a pinhole camera. He built a tiny camera using aluminum foil and a 110 film cartridge and takes awesomely unusual photos with the device inside his mouth, held in place by his back teeth. Quinnell uses his homemade camera to take tonsil-vision shots of everything from scenic travel destinations, his own feet soaking in the bathtub, a visit to the dentist and even the nightmarish image of a dead spider resting on his toothbrush as it enters his mouth. Basically he photographs anything that he thinks will make his kids laugh.

Sometimes he had to hold his mouth open, standing still, in front of his target for up to a minute for the film to be properly exposed

He said: ‘I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings and things like that. It was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved.’

Visit Justin Quinnell’s website to check out more of his wonderfully peculiar oral pinhole photography.

[via 22 Words and the Daily Mail]

(via photographsonthebrain)

abealy:

bwrds_august 2014

mpdrolet:

Shiprock, New Mexico, 2012 from The Rez
Lois Conner

mpdrolet:

Shiprock, New Mexico, 2012 from The Rez

Lois Conner

(via photographsonthebrain)